After breakfast – fast and easy Light breakfast Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink?

Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink?

Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink
Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink Welcome to the inaugural Orange Juice Week, presented by 5Alive Pulpy. This week, at “breakfast time” each day, we will share information about orange juice. Why orange juice is the beverage of choice for breakfast has always baffled me. There is nothing about orange juice that makes it more breakfast-like than other juices, so it is, for lack of a better word, “strange” that orange juice is our default breakfast beverage of choice.

  1. I mean, it’s perfect in a mimosa, but there must be more to it than that.
  2. Because Eat.Drink.
  3. I researched the history of orange juice and its place on the breakfast table after discovering that Lagos is for the people.
  4. It turns out that there is little science involved.
  5. Albert Lasker, a marketing executive, was responsible for the remarkable beverage propaganda that made orange juice a breakfast staple.

Lasker, one of the inspirations for Don Draper in Mad Men, took on the California Fruit Growers Exchange (CFGE) as clients for his firm, Lord & Thomas, in the early 1900s. At the time, the CFGE was producing an incredible quantity of oranges without corresponding demand.

  1. The CFGE had two options: supply reduction or demand creation.
  2. For obvious reasons, reducing supply was not on the agenda; they were not attempting to earn less money.
  3. As a result, the CFGE, like any other business struggling with product sales, turned to advertising as a solution.
  4. But exactly how could advertising be utilized? You could not simply broadcast nationalistic advertisements for a farming cooperative.

You could simply advertise an orange, which they did, but I wouldn’t be writing this if the campaign had achieved success beyond my wildest dreams. To promote their orange agenda further, Lasker compelled the CFGE to divulge insights gleaned from their routine trips to restock stores.

  • They discovered that attendants despised making freshly-squeezed juice above all else.
  • The amount of time required to prepare a glass and the associated cleanup was an absolute pain.
  • Consequently, many retailers accounted for this when setting prices for freshly-squeezed juice.
  • It’s absolutely hilarious that making freshly-squeezed juice is still annoying a century later.

I digress. Lasker’s team and the CFGE reasoned that if store employees encountered this issue, then customers at home would likely face the same obstacle and, out of frustration, choose a “easier” beverage. Both teams realized that it would be much simpler to offer the consumer a pre-squeezed orange that could be selected from a store shelf.

  • This realization resulted in the creation of the juice extractor.
  • Lord & Thomas capitalized on this good fortune by launching the “Drink an Orange” campaign in 1916, which included a juice extractor and two oranges.
  • In one of the first advertisements, orange juice was described as “healthiness itself.” The campaign successfully persuaded Americans that drinking orange juice would significantly improve their health, and as anticipated, orange consumption per serving increased significantly.
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How did breakfast arrive, though? The explanation for this is fairly straightforward, and I could have stated it from the outset. But that is dull. In addition to producing lemons, the CFGE faced intense competition from imported lemons. The CFGE began aggressively marketing lemons with the assistance of Lord & Thomas in 1915.

To ensure the success of both fruit campaigns, orange juice was positioned as the beverage of the morning and lemonade as the beverage of the afternoon. And when American culture became the dominant culture worldwide, orange juice in the morning and other uniquely American practices became the norm. – Bibliographic citation: Cruikshank, Jeffrey L., and Arthur W.

Schultz. The Amazing (but True!) Story of Albert D. Lasker, the Man Who Sold America. Previous Harvard Business Review Press, 2010 Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink

Why is orange juice consumed in the morning?

Advantages of drinking orange juice for breakfast Vitamins for our body thanks to the complete absorption of vitamin C during fasting. Decrease in constipation. Natural energy source.

2. Should drink orange juice before or after eating? – Many people believe that orange juice is delicious and that it can be consumed at any time. However, this viewpoint is incorrect because orange juice contains high levels of vitamin C and acidity, which, if consumed at inappropriate times of the day, can cause significant organ damage.

Specifically, drinking orange juice on an empty stomach is detrimental to the digestive system. Orange juice’s vitamin C content can interact with stomach acid and cause ulcers when consumed in large quantities. People with stomach problems are more susceptible to increased acid levels when drinking orange juice on an empty stomach, leading to symptoms such as heartburn and worsening ulcers.

In contrast, consuming orange juice when you are full can cause your stomach to become overloaded because it is already working at full capacity to digest the amount of food consumed. When orange juice is consumed after a meal, it can add pressure to the stomach, causing bloating, abdominal pain, and abdominal discomfort.

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Who began drinking orange juice for breakfast?

Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink Welcome to the inaugural Orange Juice Week, presented by 5Alive Pulpy. This week, at “breakfast time” each day, we will share information about orange juice. Why orange juice is the beverage of choice for breakfast has always baffled me. There is nothing about orange juice that makes it more breakfast-like than other juices, so it is, for lack of a better word, “strange” that orange juice is our default breakfast beverage of choice.

  • I mean, it’s perfect in a mimosa, but there must be more to it than that.
  • Because Eat.Drink.
  • I researched the history of orange juice and its place on the breakfast table after discovering that Lagos is for the people.
  • It turns out that there is little science involved.
  • Albert Lasker, a marketing executive, was responsible for the remarkable beverage propaganda that made orange juice a breakfast staple.

Lasker, one of the inspirations for Don Draper in Mad Men, took on the California Fruit Growers Exchange (CFGE) as clients for his firm, Lord & Thomas, in the early 1900s. At the time, the CFGE was producing an incredible quantity of oranges without corresponding demand.

The CFGE had two options: supply reduction or demand creation. For obvious reasons, reducing supply was not on the agenda; they were not attempting to earn less money. As a result, the CFGE, like any other business struggling with product sales, turned to advertising as a solution. But exactly how could advertising be utilized? You could not simply broadcast nationalistic advertisements for a farming cooperative.

You could simply advertise an orange, which they did, but I wouldn’t be writing this if the campaign had achieved success beyond my wildest dreams. To promote their orange agenda further, Lasker compelled the CFGE to divulge insights gleaned from their routine trips to restock stores.

  1. They discovered that attendants despised making freshly-squeezed juice above all else.
  2. The amount of time required to prepare a glass and the associated cleanup was an absolute pain.
  3. Consequently, many retailers accounted for this when setting prices for freshly-squeezed juice.
  4. It’s absolutely hilarious that making freshly-squeezed juice is still annoying a century later.
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I digress. Lasker’s team and the CFGE reasoned that if store employees encountered this issue, then customers at home would likely face the same obstacle and, out of frustration, choose a “easier” beverage. Both teams realized that it would be much simpler to offer the consumer a pre-squeezed orange that could be selected from a store shelf.

This realization resulted in the creation of the juice extractor. Lord & Thomas capitalized on this good fortune by launching the “Drink an Orange” campaign in 1916, which included a juice extractor and two oranges. In one of the first advertisements, orange juice was described as “healthiness itself.” The campaign successfully persuaded Americans that drinking orange juice would significantly improve their health, and as anticipated, orange consumption per serving increased significantly.

How did breakfast arrive, though? The explanation for this is fairly straightforward, and I could have stated it from the outset. But that is dull. In addition to producing lemons, the CFGE faced intense competition from imported lemons. The CFGE began aggressively marketing lemons with the assistance of Lord & Thomas in 1915.

To ensure the success of both fruit campaigns, orange juice was positioned as the beverage of the morning and lemonade as the beverage of the afternoon. And when American culture became the dominant culture worldwide, orange juice in the morning and other uniquely American practices became the norm. – Bibliographic citation: Cruikshank, Jeffrey L., and Arthur W.

Schultz. The Amazing (but True!) Story of Albert D. Lasker, the Man Who Sold America. Previous Harvard Business Review Press, 2010 Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink Why Is Orange Juice A Breakfast Drink

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